Sacred groves of Kodagu: How faith is helping conserving Karnataka’s protected forests

Water for the Kaveri and bees for pollinating coffee plantations, the ecosystem services of 1,214 sacred groves of Kodagu is immense. Even though Kodagu groves are protected forests under the Indian Forest Act, they also face pressures similar to the other forest patches in other parts of the country. Read more

Rural Producers Collectives in India

This study booklet aims to provide an overview of producers’ collectives in India, which broadly falls under the cooperative movement. It will also highlight some case studies of successful collective organizations, with a variety of organizational styles and under different laws, mainly to get a taste of the diversity of rural collectives in India.

Rural Community Leaders Combatting Climate Change

This article from the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change tells the story of how Indian NGO Swayam Shikshan Prayog has created a network of 1,100 women entrepreneurs across India who are promoting clean energy through a complete “ecosystem” approach. Most rural households in India rely on polluting energy sources like firewood and kerosene for their…

Honey with coffee reinforces climate resilience

Honey with coffee reinforces climate resilience

While honey can sweeten coffee for the drinker, coffee farmers of Kodagu district of Karnataka are realising that raising bees for honey in their farms can sweeten their economic returns. It is one of the innovative methods being tried out in the district to provide additional financial incentives to coffee farmers to conserve the landscape they have inherited. This, in turn, can strengthen climate resilience and improve the water flow into the Cauvery. Writes S. Gopikrishna Warrier for India Climate Dialogue.

Climate change measured in coffee rain

Climate change measured in coffee rain

In Kodagu, the changing climate is making rainfall erratic. With erratic rainfall, famers are opting to use irrigation, reducing their need for shade trees. When they let the shade trees die, there is an adverse effect on the water flow into the Cauvery River, as well as climate resilience in the surrounding hills and plains. By S. Gopikrishna Warrier, for India Climate Dialogue. (Photo: Coffee farmer B.B. Thammaiah’s rainfall record, photo by author.)